Star Wars: Episode VI Return of the Jedi

Directed by Richard Marquand, the thrilling Star Wars: Episode VI Return of the Jedi finds our heroes on a mission to free Han Solo from the clutches of Jabba the Hutt.

But the ultimate battle is between father and son, as Luke Skywalker faces Darth Vader one last time in the presence of the Emperor — a powerful Sith Lord who hopes to lure the young Jedi to the dark side and crush the Rebellion once and for all.

Released May 25, 1983

It took a team of puppeteers both inside and outside Jabba the Hutt’s massive frame to bring him to life.

The sail barge set was one of the largest in all the Star Wars films, with a 30,000-square-foot platform.

When he began reading the script for the first time, Mark Hamill thought Luke would indeed turn to the dark side, and then be redeemed later in the film.

Return of the Jedi 's memorable speeder bike scene was accomplished using life-sized props, puppets, and miniatures, along with new camera technology.

The gigantic rancor was actually an 18-inch-tall rod puppet.

Directed by Richard Marquand, the thrilling Star Wars: Episode VI Return of the Jedi finds our heroes on a mission to free Han Solo from the clutches of Jabba the Hutt.

But the ultimate battle is between father and son, as Luke Skywalker faces Darth Vader one last time in the presence of the Emperor — a powerful Sith Lord who hopes to lure the young Jedi to the dark side and crush the Rebellion once and for all.

Released May 25, 1983

It took a team of puppeteers both inside and outside Jabba the Hutt’s massive frame to bring him to life.

The sail barge set was one of the largest in all the Star Wars films, with a 30,000-square-foot platform.

When he began reading the script for the first time, Mark Hamill thought Luke would indeed turn to the dark side, and then be redeemed later in the film.

Return of the Jedi 's memorable speeder bike scene was accomplished using life-sized props, puppets, and miniatures, along with new camera technology.

The gigantic rancor was actually an 18-inch-tall rod puppet.