Star Wars: Episode IV A New Hope

A cinematic landmark, Star Wars: Episode IV A New Hope, written and directed by George Lucas, changed filmmaking forever and introduced the world to a galaxy far, far away.

After discovering a hidden message from Princess Leia, Luke Skywalker is catapulted into an unforgettable adventure. Along with Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi, as well as rogue smuggler Han Solo and his co-pilot Chewbacca, Luke sets out to rescue the princess, destroy the Empire’s ultimate weapon, and become a Jedi.

Released May 25, 1977

ILM constructed several miniature X-wings for the film; the production team built one full-scale model for the Yavin 4 hangar sequence.

In its original run, the film was simply called Star Wars. “Episode IV A New Hope” was added starting with the April 10, 1981, theatrical re-release.

George Lucas’ love of auto racing influenced A New Hope in many ways, especially the blinding speed of the film’s climactic Death Star trench run.

Sound designer Ben Burtt assembled a library of organic sounds for A New Hope; Chewbacca's voice came from the growls of bears and other animals.

With Episode IV, ILM pioneered the use of motion-controlled cameras that could be programmed by computer — a process used to give stationary models the illusion of movement, creating the film’s thrilling dogfights.

A cinematic landmark, Star Wars: Episode IV A New Hope, written and directed by George Lucas, changed filmmaking forever and introduced the world to a galaxy far, far away.

After discovering a hidden message from Princess Leia, Luke Skywalker is catapulted into an unforgettable adventure. Along with Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi, as well as rogue smuggler Han Solo and his co-pilot Chewbacca, Luke sets out to rescue the princess, destroy the Empire’s ultimate weapon, and become a Jedi.

Released May 25, 1977

ILM constructed several miniature X-wings for the film; the production team built one full-scale model for the Yavin 4 hangar sequence.

In its original run, the film was simply called Star Wars. “Episode IV A New Hope” was added starting with the April 10, 1981, theatrical re-release.

George Lucas’ love of auto racing influenced A New Hope in many ways, especially the blinding speed of the film’s climactic Death Star trench run.

Sound designer Ben Burtt assembled a library of organic sounds for A New Hope; Chewbacca's voice came from the growls of bears and other animals.

With Episode IV, ILM pioneered the use of motion-controlled cameras that could be programmed by computer — a process used to give stationary models the illusion of movement, creating the film’s thrilling dogfights.