Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

In Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom, a dark adventure set in 1935, Indy, 11-year-old Short Round, and singer Willie Scott are on the run — eventually landing in an Indian village, which has been cursed since the theft of its sacred Sankara stone.

The trio agrees to help recover the lost artifact, but is confronted with a new set of dangers, including chilled monkey brain dessert, human sacrifice, and a deadly plot deep within the fiery Temple of Doom.

Released May 23, 1984

Many sequences set in exotic locales were shot in California, including action scenes filmed at Mammoth Mountain and the American and Tuolumne Rivers.

Temple of Doom featured massive hand-built sets, which required a construction crew of more than 250 workers.

Construction by the numbers: 700,000 feet of timber, 10,000 yards of sash cord line, 5,000 sheets of plywood, 3,000 gallons of paint and polish, 250 tons of plaster, 160 yards of sand and 30 tons of cement

The film also featured meticulously crafted miniature sets, including one for the famous mine car tunnel chase.

ILM's Michael McAlister built a special miniature Nikon camera, which was used on rails in the tunnel set for the mine car sequence.

In Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom, a dark adventure set in 1935, Indy, 11-year-old Short Round, and singer Willie Scott are on the run — eventually landing in an Indian village, which has been cursed since the theft of its sacred Sankara stone.

The trio agrees to help recover the lost artifact, but is confronted with a new set of dangers, including chilled monkey brain dessert, human sacrifice, and a deadly plot deep within the fiery Temple of Doom.

Released May 23, 1984

Many sequences set in exotic locales were shot in California, including action scenes filmed at Mammoth Mountain and the American and Tuolumne Rivers.

Temple of Doom featured massive hand-built sets, which required a construction crew of more than 250 workers.

Construction by the numbers: 700,000 feet of timber, 10,000 yards of sash cord line, 5,000 sheets of plywood, 3,000 gallons of paint and polish, 250 tons of plaster, 160 yards of sand and 30 tons of cement

The film also featured meticulously crafted miniature sets, including one for the famous mine car tunnel chase.

ILM's Michael McAlister built a special miniature Nikon camera, which was used on rails in the tunnel set for the mine car sequence.